Viola riviniana

Week 14 – Viola riviniana

It’s the Easter school break and I’m on holiday in Pembrokeshire. This is a part of the world I know well, return to often and love like an old friend. Walking the coast path is a favourite family activity and yesterday we all walked from Whitesands Bay to St Davids Head. A dramatically beautiful walk along a well trodden cliff edge path, past the ancient Cromlech Stones, which are Neolithic burial chambers (around 5000 years old), dozens of wild horses and a plethora of beautiful flora. The bracken smells like butter and the masses of violets create subtle drifts of purple that are incredibly beautiful. The Common Dog Violet (Viola riviniana) grow well on nutrient-poor soil and this type of vegetation is characteristic of the coastal peninsulas of St Davids and Stumble Head. The plant is an early nectar source for butterflies and is the larval host plant for a range of Fritillary butterflies, including the Small Pearl-Bordered, the Pearl-Bordered and the Silver-Washed Fritillaries. It flowers from April to June but its flowers are not scented, unlike those of its cousin, the Sweet Violet. They are tiny… so get down on one knee to get a closer look and I promise you won’t be disappointed.